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How Does daylight savings time affect people with Alzheimer’s?

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Question: How Does daylight savings time affect people with Alzheimer’s?

It’s that time of year again! Daylight savings time is upon us, and while most people don’t think twice about adjusting their clocks, for those living with Alzheimer’s or other forms of dementia, the time change can be confusing and disruptive. In this blog post, we’ll explore how daylight savings time affects people with Alzheimer’s and what you can do to help ease the transition.

How Does daylight savings time affect people with Alzheimer’s?

For many people living with Alzheimer’s or other forms of dementia, the time change can be confusing and disruptive. The extra hour of daylight in the evening can throw off their internal clocks, making it difficult to sleep at night. As a result, they may become more agitated or even disoriented. Additionally, the time change can disrupt routines that are essential for managing dementia symptoms

What Can You Do To Help Ease The Transition?

There are a few things you can do to help ease the transition for your loved one during daylight savings time. First, a few days before the time change, slowly start adjusting their bedtime by 15-30 minutes. This will help their bodies gradually get used to the new sleep schedule. Additionally, make sure to keep their routine as consistent as possible during the daylight savings transition. Stick to the same mealtimes, bath times, and activities as much as possible. Finally, be patient and understanding. Time changes can be tough for everyone, so cut your loved one some slack if they seem agitated or confused.

Conclusion

The daylight savings time change can be disruptive for anyone, but for those living with Alzheimer’s or other forms of dementia, it can be especially challenging. If you have a loved one who is affected by the time change, there are some things you can do to help offset some of the negative effects. By following these tips, you can make the transition a little bit easier for everyone involved.

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